Course Overview

LLM Law Winner 2020

Winner: Postgraduate Course of the Year in Law at the gradireland Higher Education Awards 2020 sponsored by PwC. Read more here.
The judging panel’s comments included: “Excellent innovation and teaching methodology, with strong links to industry.”

This programme provides an excellent grounding in business law, for those interested in pursuing a career in legal practice or in the commercial world. Students can choose from a range of modules at an advanced level and tailor their LLM to suit their interests and career plans. You will expand your knowledge of business law from a national, regional and international perspective. Modules include such diverse options as EU Competition Law, Advanced Intellectual Property Law, and European Consumer Law to Global Issues in Contemporary Labour Law. This programme provides students with an opportunity to engage with leading commercial practitioners to develop their legal expertise and skills in business law.

Course highlights:

  • Prestigious pacements with leading commercial law firms are offered to the top 5 students on the programme.
  • Focus on skills and employability to equip students with key business skills including critical thinking, drafting legal submissions, negotiation, advocacy and mediation.
  • Expert lecturers deliver this programme through small group seminars with guest talks from leading practitioners. Students also have the opportunity to attend and present at key conferences, nationally and internationally as well as participate in moot court competitions.
  • International field trips enable students to see the law in action in a global context.
  • Career support is provided through professional workshops coaching students on CV preparation and interview skills.  Careers in Law Week also provides an opportunity to meet partners from leading law firms.
  • Business law mooting enables students to develop their advocacy skills.
  • Diverse modules from EU Competition Law, Advanced Intellectual Property Law, and Current Issues in Internet Law to Global Issues in Contemporary Labour Law. 
  • Assessment is primarily through research papers, presentations and minor thesis rather than exams.

 LLM Welcome

 

Applications and Selections

Applications are made online via the NUI Galway Postgraduate Applications System. Entry to the course is based on academic achievement as set out above and a personal statement. On occasions, interviews may also be carried out to determine the applicant’s suitability for the course. Places will be allocated on a conditional basis pending receipt of all required and verified supporting documentation.

Who Teaches this Course

  • Dr Lucy-Ann Buckley
  • Ms Ursula Connolly
  • Ms Caterina Gardiner
  • Dr Connie Healy
  • Ms Anna-Louise Hinds,
  •  Dr Padraic Kenna
  • Dr Rónán Kennedy
  • Dr Maureen O’Sullivan
  •  Dr Shivaun Quinlivan
  • Dr Brian Tobin
  • Dr Ioanna Tourkochoriti

Requirements and Assessment

Key Facts

Entry Requirements

  • An approved Second Class Honours Degree, Grade 1 (2.1) in law, or an inter-disciplinary degree in which law was a major component.
  • Applicants awarded a Graduate Diploma in Law may be considered but will be admitted only where they demonstrate a strong academic performance in both the undergraduate degree and diploma. 
  • In exceptional circumstances, an applicant holding a degree in another discipline or a degree of less than an approved Second Class Honours Degree, Grade 1 (H2.1) standard may be considered where they have relevant professional law experience.
  • International students should refer to the country-specific information section of the International Office website: http://www.nuigalway.ie/international-students/country.html

Additional Requirements

Duration

1 year, full-time; 2 years, part-time

Next start date

September 2021

A Level Grades ()

Average intake

15

Closing Date

Please see www.nuigalway.ie/postgrad/closingdates for information.

NFQ level

9

Mode of study

Taught

ECTS weighting

90

Award

LLM

CAO

Course code

ML26, full-time; ML27, part-time

Course Outline

Semester 1          3 modules (30 ECTS)
Semester 2          3 modules (30 ECTS)
Semester 3          Commercial Legal Placement (30 ECTS) or (Summer) Minor Thesis

  • Advanced Intellectual Property Law and Development Commercial Law in Practice
  • Commercial Property Law
  • Comparative Law
  • Current Issues in Internet Law
  • EU Competition Law
  • European Consumer Law and Policy
  • Global Issues in Contemporary Labour Law
  • Moot Court (Business Law)
  • Skills in Commercial Practice / Dispute Resolution

A limited number of places are available for ‘Commercial Legal Placements’, which allow students to work in a leading commercial law firm over the summer as an alternative to the minor thesis. Selection of students for ‘Commercial Legal Placement’ is competitive and is decided upon the basis of an application and interview.

Those not undertaking the placement are required to  complete a minor thesis (15,000 words) over the summer months. The thesis allows students to conduct supervised research in an area of business law of their choosing. Students will receive support and guidance from their supervisor on how to identify a research topic, conducting the research and writing up the minor thesis which will be due for submission mid-July.

Curriculum Information

Curriculum information relates to the current academic year (in most cases).
Course and module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Glossary of Terms

Credits
You must earn a defined number of credits (aka ECTS) to complete each year of your course. You do this by taking all of its required modules as well as the correct number of optional modules to obtain that year's total number of credits.
Module
An examinable portion of a subject or course, for which you attend lectures and/or tutorials and carry out assignments. E.g. Algebra and Calculus could be modules within the subject Mathematics. Each module has a unique module code eg. MA140.
Optional
A module you may choose to study.
Required
A module that you must study if you choose this course (or subject).
Semester
Most courses have 2 semesters (aka terms) per year.

Year 1 (90 Credits)

Required LW450: Dissertation


12 months long | Credits: 30


(Language of instruction: English)

Assessments

This module's usual assessment procedures, outlined below, may be affected by COVID-19 countermeasures. Current students should check Blackboard for up-to-date assessment information.

  • Research (100%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
The above information outlines module LW450: "Dissertation" and is valid from 2019 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional LW5200: Commercial Legal Placement


12 months long | Credits: 30


(Language of instruction: English)

Assessments

This module's usual assessment procedures, outlined below, may be affected by COVID-19 countermeasures. Current students should check Blackboard for up-to-date assessment information.

  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
The above information outlines module LW5200: "Commercial Legal Placement" and is valid from 2018 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional LW5201: EU Competition Law


12 months long | Credits: 10


(Language of instruction: English)

Assessments

This module's usual assessment procedures, outlined below, may be affected by COVID-19 countermeasures. Current students should check Blackboard for up-to-date assessment information.

  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
The above information outlines module LW5201: "EU Competition Law" and is valid from 2018 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional LW5202: Internet Regulation: International Trends and Topical Issues


12 months long | Credits: 10

The rapid development and deployment of internet technology was initially widely seen as a force for good. However, significant public policy issues, such as cyber bullying, hate speech, and state surveillance, have led to a growing acceptance of the need to regulate internet activity. In the meantime, the internet has become pervasive, and the reach of the internet and technology into all aspects of our lives has raised significant challenges. Many individuals now rely on internet-connected devices in their roles as citizens or consumers, routinely using desktop and mobile devices for routine activities, interacting with embedded software in cars and other elements of infrastructure, and being recorded in massive databases controlled by both public and private actors. As a result, we are enmeshed in a complex network of interactions between technology, law, and public policy issues which are difficult to manage and regulate. This module explores a number of key themes arising from these challenges: the emergence of regulation by non-state actors; the development of regulatory responses to reflect the nature of internet activity; and the reshaping of legal concepts and associated legal protection as a result of the way in which users engage with technology. These themes will be explored through an examination of key legal areas. The particular topics to be considered may change as new issues emerge, but an indicative initial list includes e-contracting; data protection and privacy; and online speech (including defamation, harassment and non-consensual pornography).
(Language of instruction: English)

Assessments

This module's usual assessment procedures, outlined below, may be affected by COVID-19 countermeasures. Current students should check Blackboard for up-to-date assessment information.

  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
The above information outlines module LW5202: "Internet Regulation: International Trends and Topical Issues" and is valid from 2018 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional LW5204: International Commercial Property Law


12 months long | Credits: 10

The course provides an introduction to key topics in commercial property law. The first such course in Ireland, it is designed to provide students with the essential conceptual and practical tools necessary to contextualise and understand commercial property law, in Ireland in European and in its global context. The integration of property finance global financial instruments places this topic at the centre of the change in the world.
(Language of instruction: English)

Assessments

This module's usual assessment procedures, outlined below, may be affected by COVID-19 countermeasures. Current students should check Blackboard for up-to-date assessment information.

  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
The above information outlines module LW5204: "International Commercial Property Law" and is valid from 2018 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional LW5205: Advanced Intellectual Property Law and Development


12 months long | Credits: 10

This course examines and analyses international laws and rules in relation to intellectual property which impact on economies and livelihoods in least developed, developing and developed countries. It will scrutinise the roles played in international intellectual property/trade law by institutes such as the WTO, WIPO and the WHO. It will also consider the activities of international NGOs and their influence over the enforcement of intellectual property rights. This course will consider the groundswell of political participation in developing countries, its extension in the developed world and its potential for reform of international institutions. It adopts a critical approach to the current status quo and examines participatory and deliberative models of democracy. It is a holistic approach to the subject(s) and is, of its nature, interdisciplinary (crossing boundaries between law, economics, political science, sociology and philosophy).
(Language of instruction: English)

Assessments

This module's usual assessment procedures, outlined below, may be affected by COVID-19 countermeasures. Current students should check Blackboard for up-to-date assessment information.

  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
The above information outlines module LW5205: "Advanced Intellectual Property Law and Development" and is valid from 2018 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional LW5206: Global Issues in Contemporary Labour Law


12 months long | Credits: 10

This module examines key issues of global relevance in contemporary labour law, from a theoretical, practical and comparative perspective. Changes in labour market conditions and employment practices present a range of challenges of international relevance, in both developed and developing countries. These challenges include the rise of precarious work and the gig economy, the vindication of the right to work, the recognition of unpaid work, and broad issues of inclusion and worker protection, particularly for historically vulnerable and disadvantaged groups. This module draws on a range of theoretical perspectives to address these issues under four broad headings: the changing face of work and associated regulatory challenges; global trends in labour protection; global approaches to anti-discrimination law; and the inclusive labour market.
(Language of instruction: English)

Assessments

This module's usual assessment procedures, outlined below, may be affected by COVID-19 countermeasures. Current students should check Blackboard for up-to-date assessment information.

  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
The above information outlines module LW5206: "Global Issues in Contemporary Labour Law" and is valid from 2018 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional LW5207: International Business Law Moot


12 months long | Credits: 10

This module provides students with an opportunity to develop practical skills in legal drafting, oral advocacy and litigation by participating in a number of practical seminars and representing a hypothetical client in a mock trial (moot). It includes a taught element with a concentration on the identification of legal issues, targeted legal research, the drafting of legal submissions and the delivery of effective oral argument. The majority of the course is devoted to independent student work where students working in teams of two prepare the written arguments and oral pleadings for a hypothetical international business law case. These arguments will be presented in a mock trial where students will advocate for their ‘client’ against an opposing legal team.
(Language of instruction: English)

Assessments

This module's usual assessment procedures, outlined below, may be affected by COVID-19 countermeasures. Current students should check Blackboard for up-to-date assessment information.

  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
The above information outlines module LW5207: "International Business Law Moot" and is valid from 2018 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional LW5208: European Consumer Law and Policy


12 months long | Credits: 10

Consumer law and policy is a significant and rapidly developing area of EU regulation. This module aims to provide a critical understanding of the development of EU Consumer policy including its legal basis in the EU treaties. It will explore the various theories of regulation that underlie EU legislative measures and will examine and discuss methods of regulation. The module will then focus on specific areas of consumer protection regulation such as unfair terms, unfair commercial practices, and consumer rights in the digital environment. The module will examine the activity of the European Community legislature, the case law of the European Court of Justice and the relationship between the European Community system and domestic legal regimes. The module will also examine the theory and practice of enforcement of consumer rights and consumer redress.
(Language of instruction: English)

Assessments

This module's usual assessment procedures, outlined below, may be affected by COVID-19 countermeasures. Current students should check Blackboard for up-to-date assessment information.

  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
The above information outlines module LW5208: "European Consumer Law and Policy" and is valid from 2018 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional LW5209: Legal Skills: Commercial Practice, Advocacy and Dispute Resolution


12 months long | Credits: 10

The purpose of this module is to introduce students to the operation of commercial law in the real world. The module involves a number of interactive seminars delivered by leading commercial law practitioners. This module allows students to explore a range of topical and emerging issues in commercial legal practice from local, national, regional and international perspectives. The seminars delivered on the module will vary from year to year to all students engage with topical and important issues in commercial law.
(Language of instruction: English)

Assessments

This module's usual assessment procedures, outlined below, may be affected by COVID-19 countermeasures. Current students should check Blackboard for up-to-date assessment information.

  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
The above information outlines module LW5209: "Legal Skills: Commercial Practice, Advocacy and Dispute Resolution" and is valid from 2018 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional LW5210: Commercial Law in Context


12 months long | Credits: 10

The purpose of this module is to introduce students to the operation of commercial law in the real world. The module involves a number of interactive seminars delivered by leading commercial law practitioners. This module allows students to explore a range of topical and emerging issues in commercial legal practice from local, national, regional and international perspectives. The seminars delivered on the module will vary from year to year to all students engage with topical and important issues in commercial law.
(Language of instruction: English)

Assessments

This module's usual assessment procedures, outlined below, may be affected by COVID-19 countermeasures. Current students should check Blackboard for up-to-date assessment information.

  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
The above information outlines module LW5210: "Commercial Law in Context" and is valid from 2018 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional LW483: Advanced Legal Research & Method


12 months long | Credits: 10

This module will build on the research skills already acquired by students in their primary law degree programmes and/or work experience. It will be closely linked to and designed to facilitate the writing components and the minor thesis requirement of all students on the programme. The module will also equip students with the skills necessary to present conference papers and to publish law journal articles. This module, in tandem with the ongoing availability of the lecturer for individualised assistance, will provide students with the “tools” necessary to successfully undertake the high volume of legal research and writing required by the taught LL.M. programmes. For two weeks of the module, through sessions held in the law library’s training room, students will be exposed to advanced methodologies of computerised legal research utilising Lexis, Westlaw, Justis, Hein-on-Line and the ever-increasing number of freely available legal research databases on the worldwide web. Students will be shown the wide range of databases and special collections available to them as postgraduate students at NUI Galway. The module will also devote significant amounts of time in seminars to legal citation style (OSCOLA Ireland), advanced legal writing technique, advanced critical and analytical thinking methodologies, preparation of abstracts for conference papers and law journal articles, best practices in making conference and other oral presentations and the process of and reasons for drafting literature reviews.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Research and cite primary and secondary legal materials correctly
  2. Engage in advanced critical thinking and textual analysis
  3. Write at an advanced level
  4. Prepare a literature review
  5. Draft abstracts and present conference papers
Assessments

This module's usual assessment procedures, outlined below, may be affected by COVID-19 countermeasures. Current students should check Blackboard for up-to-date assessment information.

  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
Reading List
  1. "Schweppe et al, How to Think, Write and Cite: Key Skills for Irish Law Students (Round Hall, 2nd ed, 2016)" by n/a
  2. "Murray, How to Write a Thesis (Open University Press, 2nd ed, 2006)" by n/a
  3. "O’Malley, Sources of Law (Round Hall, 2nd ed, 2001)" by n/a
  4. "Ridley, The Literature Review (Sage, 2008)" by n/a
  5. "Wallace and Wray, Critical Reading and Writing for Postgraduates (Sage, 2006)" by n/a
The above information outlines module LW483: "Advanced Legal Research & Method" and is valid from 2019 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional LW5211: EU External Relations Law


12 months long | Credits: 10

The purpose of this module is to explore the principal elements and legal foundations of the EU’s external action. This is an area that has expanded greatly in recent years, not least since the Lisbon Treaty, and questions around the EU’s participation in international organizations, its contribution to and reception of international law in the EU legal order, as well as relations with its near neighbours, have given rise to a number of important legal developments, often of constitutional significance. As well as addressing the interaction between EU and international law, the module will address the EU's external competences and objectives, and its capacity to project its own norms, through an exploration of a number of key substantive policy areas, including international trade, security and defence policy, development cooperation, and enlargement and neighbourhood policy.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Engage critically with the idea of the EU as a global norm promoter
  2. Understand the principal elements and legal foundations of the EU’s external action
  3. Critically evaluate the interaction between the EU and international law, including whether and how the EU contributes to international law
  4. Assess the impact of recent developments in key substantive policy areas related to external relations
Assessments

This module's usual assessment procedures, outlined below, may be affected by COVID-19 countermeasures. Current students should check Blackboard for up-to-date assessment information.

  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Module Director
Reading List
  1. "EU External Relations Law and Policy in the Post-Lisbon Era" by Paul James Cardwell
    ISBN: 9789067048231.
    Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
  2. "EU External Relations and Systems of Governance" by Paul James Cardwell
    ISBN: 9780415685603.
  3. "Developments in EU External Relations Law" by Marise Cremona
    ISBN: 9780199552894.
    Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand
  4. "Eu Law Beyond Eu Borders" by Marise Cremona,Joanne Scott
    ISBN: 9780198842170.
  5. "Law and Practice of EU External Relations" by Alan Dashwood,Marc Maresceau
    ISBN: 9780521182553.
    Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  6. "Constitutional Principles of EU External Relations" by G. de Baere
    ISBN: 9780199546688.
    Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
  7. "EU Powers Under External Pressure" by Christina Eckes
    ISBN: 9780198785545.
    Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
  8. "EU External Relations Law" by Piet Eeckhout
    ISBN: 9780199659951.
    Publisher: OUP Oxford
  9. "EU External Relations Law and the European Neighbourhood Policy" by Bart Van Vooren
    ISBN: 9780415724500.
  10. "The EU's Role in Global Governance" by Bart Van Vooren,Steven Blockmans,Jan Wouters
    ISBN: 9780199659654.
    Publisher: Oxford University Press
  11. "EU External Relations Law" by Bart Van Vooren,Ramses A. Wessel
    ISBN: 9781107684300.
    Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  12. "Joris Larik (eds): EU External Relations Law: Text, Cases and Materials" by Hart Publishing, 2020
    ISBN: ISBN:97815099.
  13. "EU External Relations Law and Policy in the Post-Lisbon Era" by Paul James Cardwell
    ISBN: 9789067048231.
    Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
The above information outlines module LW5211: "EU External Relations Law" and is valid from 2020 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional LW506: Climate Change Law & Policy


12 months long | Credits: 10

This module examines climate change law and policy, nationally and internationally. Amongst the issues considered are: new environmental policy instruments; the interaction between science and law in policy-making; the development of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, the Kyoto Protocol, and negotiations for a successor to the latter; standing in climate change litigation; the European Emissions Trading Scheme; emissions from transport; renewable energy and biofuels; emissions from buildings; climate change and taxation policy; the various Irish National Climate Change Strategies; the Sustainable Energy Act 2002; domestic implementation of emissions trading and the Energy Performance of Buildings Directive; planning law and climate change; carbon capture and storage; climate finance law.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. explain the scientific background to climate change as a global issue
  2. discuss the applicability of environmental policy instruments to climate change as a regulatory issue
  3. analyse and critique the international response to climate change
  4. analyse and critique the European response to climate change
  5. analyse and critique the Irish response to climate change
  6. explain and apply the Irish regulatory schemes that implement climate change policy
  7. propose policies to improve climate change law in practice
Assessments

This module's usual assessment procedures, outlined below, may be affected by COVID-19 countermeasures. Current students should check Blackboard for up-to-date assessment information.

  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
Reading List
  1. "Aldy and Stavins, Post-Kyoto International Climate Policy: Summary for Policymakers" by Cambridge University Press, 2009
  2. "Bolin, A History of the Science and Politics of Climate Change" by Cambridge University Press, 2007
  3. "Holder and Lee, Environmental Protection, Law and Policy: Text and Materials" by Cambridge University Press, 2007
  4. "Wold et al, Climate Change and the Law" by LexisNexis, 2009
  5. "EU and US Approaches" by Oxford University Press, 2010
The above information outlines module LW506: "Climate Change Law & Policy" and is valid from 2020 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional LW5203: Advanced Comparative Law


12 months long | Credits: 10

The objective of this course is to introduce students to the study of comparative law and to the ways in which the differences in the regulation of many similar activities reflects the dominant political ideologies that affect the understanding and the application of the law. Learning how foreign legal systems regulate a number of activities is essential to contemporary legal practice due to the transnational character of cases under litigation in a global context. Ultimately students will be able to reflect critically upon the differences in the legal regulation and legal processes. They will gain insights on how these differences can be mutually instructive in view of resolving common problems. Comparative law is a method of approaching the law, a skill necessary to contemporary lawyers as it enhances critical thinking and promotes their understanding of the need to implement basic ideas of justice in their practice.
(Language of instruction: English)

Assessments

This module's usual assessment procedures, outlined below, may be affected by COVID-19 countermeasures. Current students should check Blackboard for up-to-date assessment information.

  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Module Director
Lecturers / Tutors
The above information outlines module LW5203: "Advanced Comparative Law" and is valid from 2018 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Why Choose This Course?

Career Opportunities

The LLM in International and Comparative Business Law is of particular interest to students interested in pursuing a career with an international law firm.  The School of Law runs a programme of careers events annually including a Careers in Law Week, during which students have an opportunity to meet partners from leading law firms and attend interview-skills workshops. An enhanced knowledge of the international business world and its interactive relationship with laws and regulations allows students to develop an exceptional set of skills along with a global outlook. 

Additionally, the programme offers a number of ‘Commercial Legal Placements’ with the leading law firms in the jurisdiction enhancing the students practical knowledge of working in a commercial firm and ensuring they gain skills which will be very attractive to prospective employers in the commercial sector. Graduates can consult on business and legal matters to international law firms, multinational professional services firms, in-house counsel with major global firms and more.

 

 

Who’s Suited to This Course

Three reasons to choose this course:

  1. Students undertaking this course will have the opportunity to compete for one of seven very prestigious commercial legal placements with leading commercial law firms.
  2. As there is a focus on gaining practical skills in many of the modules offered, students will be well placed to enter the business world having acquired key transferrable skills to include: critical thinking, legal writing, negotiation, advocacy, mediation, among others.
  3. Students will benefit from the expertise of the leading commercial lawyers delivering content on the programme, guest lectures and networking opportunities with key commercial experts including our adjunct Professor Thomas Courtney, Chairman of the Company Law Review Group and Partner at Arthur Cox, Solicitors.

Learning Outcomes

 

Work Placement

A unique feature of the LL.M in International and Comparative Business Law is that there are seven placements with commercial law firms for the top students on the programme. This follows from the skills-based nature of the programme which enables students to develop their advocacy skills, negotiation, mediation and presentation skills so that they have the attributes necessary to fit seamlessly into a law firm.

Many of the recruiters have commented on the high standard of those applying for placements and, in some cases, have intimated the possibility keeping these students on for traineeships.  This year’s students have secured placements with: Arthur Cox, L.K. Shields, A&L Goodbody, Matheson Solicitors and Ronan Daly Jerym Solicitors. Another student was successful in securing a placement with Flynn O’Driscoll, Solicitors.

Please see the for more on their experiences on placement.

Study Abroad

Related Student Organisations

Course Fees

Fees: EU

€7,600 p.a. 2021/22

Fees: Tuition

€7,376 p.a. 2021/22

Fees: Student levy

€224 p.a. 2021/22

Fees: Non EU

€17,000 p.a. 2021/22

Find out More

Dr Edel Hughes
T: +353 91 492 394
E: edel.hughes@nuigalway.ie 

Queries about this and other LLM programmes in the School of Law can also be directed to lawpostgrad@nuigalway.ie.


What Our Students Say

David

David Martin |    

The LLM in International and Comparative Business Law has given me the flexibility to research closely with dynamic and passionate people, who share my interests. The smaller groups make engagement much easier and more beneficial. While studying I had the opportunity to shape my postgraduate degree to a certain extent, which is the most rewarding part of the programme. This LLM gives an unrivalled experience of legal writing and research and an active learning component, which is applicable to any career path.
Dharitri

Dharitri Datar |    

The LL.M. in International and Comparative Business Law is unique for a number of reasons: it involved a philosophical engagement with legal theories beyond individual jurisdictions; we were trained in a high level of research and drafting skills, and I came out of it better able to organise my thoughts and arguments. The small class sizes allowed for engagement and discussions that are just not possible at an undergraduate level. Finally, it had a number of highlights: visiting the Galway Courthouse for our moot court finals, the Supreme Court visit, a number of lectures from internationally renowned academics and an opportunity to compete for a Commercial Legal Placement which resulted in me securing my traineeship with A&L Goodbody, Solicitors which will begin in 2020. I highly recommend this programme to anyone who is interested in exploring commercial law at an academic level, and being better prepared for the realities of corporate practice.

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