Inaugural Lecture Series

‌‌‌‌‌New Professors' Inaugural Lecture Series

The College of Arts, Social Sciences, and Celtic Studies is hosting a series of lectures by recently appointed Professors in the College. The Lectures take place in the Moore Institute for Research in the Humanities and Social Studies (G010, The Hardiman Building). The first lecture took place on  Thursday March 8th at 5pm when the Dean of College, Professor Cathal O'Donoghue spoke on the subject of “Recognising Diversity and Complexity in Policy Formation”.

 

Date

Lecturer

Title and Links

Cathal O'Donoghue

8th March, 2018 at 1p.m.

Professor Cathal O'Donoghue

 

"Recognising Diversity and Complexity in Policy Formation" 

Lecture Summary and Presentation

 Macruairc2

10th April, 2018, at 5.30 p.m.

Professor Gerry MacRuairc

“Caution: Children at School Perspectives on Learning, Leaders and Learners. Imperatives for Inclusive Schools”

Lecture Summary and Presentation

 

 Brian McGuire

 3rd May, 2018 at 1p.m

Professor Brian McGuire

 "Online therapies for people with chronic health conditions: Prospects and challenges."

Lecture Summary and Presentation

NReilly

21st June, 2018

5p.m.

Professor Niamh Reilly

"The political and social thought of Tom Kettle (1880-1916): Recovering a distinctive Irish thinker"

Lecture Summary and Presentation

 tadhg photo

4th October, 2018 at 5p.m.

An tOllamh Tadhg Ó hIfearnáin

“An dúchas, an anaithnideacht agus an seachadadh teanga / Nativeness, anonymity and language transmission”

Lecture Summary and Presentation

 Molly photo 8th November, 2018 at 5p.m. Professor Molly Byrne

"It’s behaviour, stupid! A decade of lessons in health behaviour change research"

Lecture Summary and Presentation

 enrico photo 13th December, 2018 at 5p.m. Professor Enrico Dal Lago

"The Social Origins of Agrarian Violence in Comparative Perspective: The First Ku Klux Klan in South Carolina and the Early Mafia in Sicily, 1865-1875"

Lecture Summary and Presentation

Lecture Series Introductions 2018

  

 Professor Cathal O'Donoghue

“Recognising Diversity and Complexity in Policy Formation”

Presentation Slides

Introduction:

Professor O'Donoghue has been from 2016, the Dean of Arts and Social Sciences at NUI Galway and Professor of Public and Social Policy. Prior to this he was since 2005, Head of Teagasc’s (Irelands Agriculture and Food Development Authority) Rural Economy and Development Programme, one of the 4 research programmes of Teagasc. He was a member of the Fund Council of CGIAR, a $1 billion a year International Agri-Food Research organisation from 2014-2016. From 2012-2014, he was CEO of the Irish Government's Commission for the Economic Development of Rural Areas 2012-2014, Chairman of the Irish Sport Horse Strategy Committee 2013-2015, President of the International Microsimulation Association 2011-2015 and is on the Executive of the UK Agricultural Economics Society.

In his inaugural lecture, Professor O'Donoghue will draw upon the results of his research career to date to describe the methodologies he has developed and conclusions he has drawn for policy analysis and design and to reach out to new collaborators in inter-disciplinary research. His research aims to understand how policy impacts across the population, incorporating the breadth of diversity that exists in different population groups. His  field of research is in the area of Micro-Simulation Modelling, where for 25 years , he has developed tools to simulate the impact of public policy on Micro distributions (individuals, Families, Farms). Fundamentally these are tools to understand complexity. Policy formation involves understanding complexity via complexity of policy, complexity of population structure and complexity of behavioural response. In addition, other dimensions that can be considered include spatial and temporal complexity. In this lecture, Professor O'Donoghue will discuss how the development of these tools have been used to consider policy questions such as anti-poverty, environmental, labour market, education, agricultural and rural policy. His work is currently focusing on the interaction between land-use change and demographic both in a contemporary setting and in understanding historical land use drivers of demographic changes. 

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Professor Gerry Mac Ruairc

“Caution: Children at School Perspectives on Learning, Leaders and Learners. Imperatives for Inclusive Schools” 

 headphones 3Live Link to lecture
Introduction

The purpose of this address is to problematize a number of elements in our current school system with a view to identifying ways in which schools can become more inclusive, nurturing spaces for all learners irrespective of class, gender, ability, ethnicity, sexuality or the intersectional, interconnected nature of these social categorisations. In doing this, Gerry will outline a number of vignettes that represent issues or dilemmas within the Irish education system. These vignettes draw on personal and professional experiences. Some are autobiographical, based on experience as a student, a teacher, a school inspector and more recently a researcher and teacher educator; others are based on media interpretations of aspects of the school system more broadly.

These examples will serve to identify and explicate fault lines or points of departure for a critical examination of a number of underlying issues that impact the field of education, specifically these will relate to the persistence of ‘grand narratives’ in framing school experience and determining educational outcomes, the legacy of neo liberalism on discourse and practice in education and the marginalisation of theoretical perspectives in policy and reform  The final part of this address will focus on exploring ways in which many of the issues identified can be  explored differently, in ways that change the learning  experiences  of children and young people in school. By explicating how schools can work with diversity and difference and by problematizing the ways in which exclusionary practices prevail in schools, it is possible to identify a number of ways forward. This type of emancipatory engagement with the theoretical roots of education coupled with the Gramscian idea of teachers as organic intellectuals whose task it is not only to understand but to transform provides a very strong imperative for more radical action. Finally, this exploration concludes with a focus on the crucial and critical role school leaders can play in redefining and reshaping schools in order to include. An exemplar of leadership practice from a current research project on leadership and diversity in schools will confirm that, when leadership is explicitly informed by a strong commitment to inclusion and equity, exceptional outcomes are achievable. 

Gerry Mac Ruairc is the Established Professor of Education and Head of the School of Education. Previously Gerry was a teacher, school inspector and associate professor in the School of Education in University College Dublin. He has lead a number of research projects in literacy, school improvement, leadership and teacher education funded by Atlantic Philanthropies, the Department of Education and Skills, the World Bank, the EU Commission and Erasmus +.  He has also designed, developed and directed a number of graduate programmes in Education including two innovative, online/blended courses on school leadership. Gerry has also held a Fellowship in Teaching and Academic Development. He is a lead partner in consortium of three universities (NUIG, UCD and UL) that won the Department of Education and Skills and Centre for School leadership tended to design and teach a national Post-Graduate Diploma in School Leadership (PGSL) as well as a linked and blended version of the programme for Irish Medium schools hosted by the School of Education at NUI Galway. Currently he is working with Ecole supérieure de l'éducation nationale - www.esen.education.fr on a bid in response to this call . The aim is to run a network of relevant organisations to promote co-operation and the development and implementation of policies with regard to teachers and school leaders.

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Professor Brian McGuire

Presentation Slides

"Online therapies for people with chronic health conditions: Prospects and challenges."

Live link to lecture headphones 3

In this talk, Prof. Brian McGuire from School of Psychology will describe the growing use of internet-based psychological therapies to help people with chronic health conditions to cope and adapt to their conditions.  He will describe the research carried out in his group to help people with conditions such as chronic muscular pain and chronic headache, chronic fatigue following cancer, multiple sclerosis and other chronic conditions. His talk will describe the potential benefits of these therapies as well some of the challenges in making them more widely available.

Brian McGuire is a Professor of Clinical Psychology. He is a graduate of NUI Galway and has also completed a Masters Degree in Clinical Psychology (Sydney), a Diploma in Criminology (Sydney), a Diploma in Health Science (Clinical Teaching, NUI Galway) and a PhD in clinical psychology (Sydney). He worked initially as a research psychologist in brain injury rehabilitation in London. He then moved to Sydney where he spent the next 10 years lecturing in psychology at several universities and working as a clinical psychologist. His clinical work was initially in the area of learning disability and challenging behaviour, before he moved into private practice where his work focused on medicolegal assessment and the rehabilitation of persons with chronic pain, acquired brain impairment, and those recovering from work and motor accidents. It was in that context that his interest in symptom magnification and malingering developed and he completed his PhD in that area. After leaving Australia, Brian was Consultant Clinical Psychologist in brain injury rehabilitation where he co-ordinated the clinical services of several in-patient rehabilitation units in the north of England. After returning to Ireland, Brian worked with the Galway Association learning disability service. He joined NUI, Galway in 2003 and was the Director of the Doctor of Psychological Science programme in Clinical Psychology until 2014 when he took up his post as HRB Research Leader in Population Health.  In addition, he is Director of the Doctor of Psychological Science for Qualified Clinicians and Joint Director of the Centre for Pain Research.

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Professor Niamh Reilly

"The social and political thought of Tom Kettle: Recovering a distinctive Irish Thinker"

Tom Kettle (1880-1916) is not very well known in Ireland today. Yet, historian Senia Pašeta notes he ‘was associated with almost every major political and cultural development’ during his lifetime. He was a gifted public intellectual, essayist, journalist, nationalist MP (1906-1910) and a soldier killed in the Battle of the Somme in 1916. In the first decade of the 20th century competing visions of future independent Ireland had vied for space, from ‘Irish-Irelander’ to cosmopolitan. Kettle stood for constitutional democracy and a non-sectarian, self-governing Irish nation and cautioned against the insular tendencies of cultural nationalism.  After his death, many appreciations lamented the loss of his brilliance -- as a thinker and writer, and especially as an orator. Following the 1916 Rising and the turn to separatist nationalism, Kettle was almost forgotten. Recently, he has figured more prominently in public discourse than at any time since his death. In this limited narrative, he is invoked as a conciliatory figure who demonstrates the possibility of combining the identities of 'British soldier', 'Irish patriot' and 'European' and is largely constructed as a precursor to Ireland's contemporary business-friendly 'centre-right'. However, there is a larger and more complex story to be told about Tom Kettle. He was a vocal advocate for the rights women and labour and a Catholic intellectual who supported the separation of Church and State.  Although his qualities as an activist thinker were widely recognised during his lifetime, Kettle's extensive writings and speeches have been largely ignored since. This lecture draws on continuing research into the social and political thought of Tom Kettle. It outlines the expansive scope of his thinking and influences, and his ideas about democracy and social justice, Irish nationalism and unionism, national development, religion and religious identity, militarism and internationalism --  all of which, it is argued, remain salient today.

Niamh Reilly is Established Professor of Political Science and Sociology at the National University of Ireland, Galway. She has published widely on issues of gender and human rights; feminist political and social theory; religion and gender in the public sphere; transnational women's movements and the United Nations; and women, peace and security. Her book, Women's Human Rights: Seeking Gender Justice in a Globalizing Age (Polity Press, 2009) was selected as an "Outstanding Academic Title for 2010" by the American Library Association/CHOICE. She is co-author of Demanding Accountability: The Global Campaign and Vienna Tribunal for Women's Human Rights (UNIFEM 1994) (with Distinguished Professor Charlotte Bunch, Rutgers University).  Niamh has many years' experience working with United Nations processes and Civil Society Organisations internationally and has served as an independent expert on the Irish government's Department of Foreign Affairs' Standing Committee on Human Rights (1997-1999) and its Consultative Group to draft Ireland's National Action Plan on UN Security Council 1325 (2010-2011). Before joining NUI Galway in 2007, Niamh was a Research Council of the UK Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Transitional Justice Institute, University of Ulster and a postdoctoral fellow in Women's Studies and Politics at the University of Limerick Ireland. Niamh is co-founder (with Dr. Breda Gray) the NUI Galway-UL research network Gender ARC.  Her research interests focus on the theory and practice of gender, human rights and international politics. Her most recent book is an edited collection (with S Scriver) entitled Religion, Gender and the Public Sphere (Routledge 2014). She is editor of The Human Rights of Women (Springer, Major Reference Works, forthcoming 2018).   In the context of Ireland's decade of centenaries (1912-1922), she is currently preparing a book on the political and social thought of Thomas Kettle (1880-1916).

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An tOllamh Tadhg Ó hIfearnáin

"An dúchas, an anaithnideacht agus an seachadadh teanga / Nativeness, anonymity and language transmission"

In his talk, Professor Ó hIfearnáin will discuss and critique three conceptual elements that are pre-eminent in the contemporary sociolinguistics of minority languages, drawing on fieldwork from the Irish and wider Gaelic context. Nativeness in language and culture has been linked directly to notions of authenticity by generations of dialectologists and anthropologists (including ethnologists and folklorists). Authenticity is itself an ideological construct that tends to see language as a natural object. It has, for instance, given rise to the ways that languages are metaphorically described as living beings in the romantic discourses that have dominated our society. ‘Real’ speakers of ‘authentic’ languages – typically elderly rural peasants in isolated communities or perhaps in the marginalised, urban working class – are seen as locally-orientated, producing language in and of their location and community. Their speech is thus seen as conservative, static, linked to a particular place and a window to somewhere out-of-modern-western time, when the speech and values of the volk were clear and valued. Language revival initiatives in Europe have largely continued this ideological concept, seeking to isolate speakers and communities from ‘contamination’ due to multilingualism and language contact. They largely model the revived or revitalised language on an imagined monolingual existence.
 
Majority languages may also have their core ideological homelands, but in their modern standardised varieties, their authority and power are essentially based on their anonymity. They are attributed as the languages of world order, reason, commerce and development, high and international culture and communication. They are the languages of everywhere and yet of nowhere in particular. However, the core aims of minoritised language revivalist movements are not simply to preserve the undiluted language and culture of pre-modern times among the ‘last speakers’ but to expand their language beyond its residual communities in both space and function. Despite nativeness and authenticity providing the motivation to undertake the revival enterprise, the ultimate goal is to negotiate a path that values nativeness and yet ‘normalises’ the language; to make it both authentic and anonymous. The balance of nativeness and anonymity has implications for received thinking on the nature of language and for intergenerational language transmission in communities which are never likely to be monolingual again.
 
Ina léacht, pléifidh an t-Ollamh Ó hIfearnáin trí choincheap atá go mór chun tosaigh i ndíospóireachtaí shochtheangeolaíocht na mionteangacha agus déanfaidh critic orthu i bhfianaise obair allamuigh i gcomhthéacs na Gaeilge. Rinne na glúine de chanúineolaithe, antraipeolaithe agus de bhéaloideasóirí nasc idir an dúchas agus an bharántúlacht. Coincheap idé-eolaíochtúil atá sa bharántúlacht ina samhlaítear teanga mar neach nádúrtha. Is de thoradh na tuisceana sin a labhraítear go meafarach faoi theangacha amhail is gur ainmhithe nó neacha beo iad. Tá fréamhacha an dioscúrsa sin sa rómánsachas agus is é a mhúnlaigh cuid mhaith de bhunsmaointe ceannasacha na sochaí comhaimseartha. De réir na smaointe sin, bíonn ‘fíorchainteoirí’ na dteangacha ‘barántúla’ lonnaithe in áiteanna agus i bpobail faoi leith, dúnta isteach orthu féin, agus a séala sin ar an teanga a labhraíonn siad. Is minice ná a mhalairt a bhíonn na ‘cainteoirí is barántúla’ ina seandaoine tuaithe agus

iad ina gcónaí i gceantair iargúlta nó, b’fhéidir, ina mbaill d’íosaicme uirbeach nach mbíonn an deis acu imeacht óna gceantar dúchais. Thar aon rud eile, samhlaítear a gcuid cainte a bheith ceangailte le dúiche faoi leith, agus an chaint sin a bheith coimeádach, gan athrú, mar a bheadh fuinneog ar an gcianaimsir inti; ar an am a raibh máistreacht ag an bpobal ar an teanga ghlan cheart agus meas acu uirthi. Tá an coincheap idé-eolaíochta céanna le brath ar fhormhór na ngluaiseachta athbheochana teanga agus cultúir timpeall na hEorpa. Ba mhian leo, chomh fada agus ab fhéidir, an pobal labhartha a choinneáil slán ó ‘smál’ an ilteangachais agus na teagmhála teanga. Múnlaítear an teanga athbheochana ar an gcineál teanga a shamhlaítear a bheadh ann dá mbeadh pobal mór aonteangach ann arís, gan anáil ná tionchar na teanga móire iasachta uirthi.
 
Is fíor go bhfuil ceantar dúchais ag gach mórtheanga ach carnann na teangacha sin a gcuid cumhachta agus a n-údarás ón dóigh a samhlaítear iad a bheith anaithnid. Creidtear gurb iad teanga an oird domhanda iad; is iad teangacha na céille agus na réasúnaíochta, an ghnó agus na forbartha, an ardchultúir agus na cumarsáide idirnáisiúnta iad. Is teangacha ar le gach áit agus le gach duine iad ach nach mbaineann le dúchas duine ar bith. Ní hé bun agus barr tograí lucht na hathbheochana cultúr agus teanga ghléghlan na ‘gcainteoirí deireanacha’ réamh-nua-aimseartha a choinneáil beo, mar sin féin. Cé gurb iad an dúchas agus an bharántúlacht a spreag na gluaiseachtaí athbheochana an chéad uair, tá sprioc eile acu. Ba mhian leo na teangacha mionlaithe a fhorbairt agus iad a chur á labhairt ar bhonn níos fairsinge, ó thaobh ceantar agus feidhme de. Caithfidh siad an dóigh a aimsiú leis an teanga a dhéanamh ‘normálta’ – a bheith dúchasach agus anaithnid ag an am céanna. Léiríonn dúshlán an chomhréitigh idir an dúchas agus an anaithnideacht ceisteanna faoi nádúr na teanga agus faoi sheachadadh na teanga i bpobail nach mbeidh aonteangach choíche arís.
 
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Tadhg Ó hIfearnáin is Established Professor of Modern Irish in NUI Galway. He was previously at the University of Limerick from 1996 until 2017. Before then, he taught in the Department of Breton and Celtic at University of Rennes 2 from 1990, after periods as a lecturer and research student in the University of Ulster at Coleraine and Utrecht University. He holds a BA (1988) and PhD (1994) in Irish from the University of Ulster at Coleraine. His research and teaching mostly focuses on questions of language and society, from the 17th century to date, and in particular the contemporary linguistics and sociolinguistics of Irish and other minoritised languages.
 
Tá Tadhg Ó hIfearnáin ina Ollamh Bunaithe le Nua-Ghaeilge in Ollscoil na hÉireann, Gaillimh. Ba in Ollscoil Luimnigh a bhí sé ag obair ó 1996 go 2017 agus in Ollscoil na Briotáine Uachtaraí ar feadh roinnt blianta roimhe sin, tar éis dó tréimhsí a chaitheamh mar iarchéimí agus léachtóir in Ollscoil Utrecht agus in Ollscoil Uladh, Cúil Raithin. Tá BA (1988) agus PhD (1994) i Léann na Gaeilge aige ó Ollscoil Uladh, Cúil Raithin. Díríonn formhór a chuid taighde agus teagaisc ar cheisteanna teanga agus sochaí ón 17ú haois go dtí an lá inniu, agus go háirithe ar theangeolaíocht agus ar shochtheangeolaíocht chomhaimseartha na Gaeilge agus mionteangacha eile.

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Professor Molly Byrne

"It’s behaviour, stupid! A decade of lessons in health behaviour change research"

In this lecture, Molly will track how her behavioural intervention research has evolved, changed and (hopefully!) improved over the last decade. She will present some of the behaviour change intervention studies she has conducted, highlighting novel approaches, methodologies and tools which have improved the quality and impact of her research. She will reflect on the key lessons she has learnt along this research journey, as well as outline some ideas about current opportunities and challenges relevant to researchers in the area of health behaviour change.

Molly is a Professor of Health Psychology at the School of Psychology, at NUI Galway. Molly joined the School in 2004. In 2014 she was awarded a Health Research Board (HRB, Ireland) Research Leadership Award (2014-2019) to establish and direct the Health Behaviour Change Research Group (HBCRG), which aims to improve population health by developing and promoting an evidence-based behavioural science approach to health behaviour change interventions. Molly is interested in developing novel approaches to increase the implementation and impact of behaviour change interventions, with particular interest in participatory approaches to research involving patients and public, especially in the areas of diabetes and cardiovascular disease prevention and management.
Molly is a member of the Executive Committees of the International Behavioural Trials Network and the HRB Primary Care Clinical Trials Network Ireland. She sits on national and European advisory boards, including the Scientific Advisory Board of the EU Joint Programme Initiative – Healthy Diet for Healthy Life and the Advisory Boards of the National Institute of Preventive Cardiology and the National Programme of Prevention of Diabetes.
Molly has published over 100 peer reviewed journal articles and been awarded research funding of €7.9 million as either Principal Investigator (PI) or co-PI from a range of national and international funders.

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Professor Enrico Dal Lago

"The Social Origins of Agrarian Violence in Comparative Perspective: The First Ku Klux Klan in South Carolina and the Early Mafia in Sicily, 1865-1875"

A comparative historical project focusing on the events and transformations that occurred in the United States in the period after the American Civil War and in Italy in the period after national unification can help us understand better the deep economic, social, and political changes experienced by the rural areas of the nineteenth-century Euro-American world. This is especially true with regard to the U.S. South and southern Italy after 1865 and in relation to issues such as the agrarian elites’ ideologies and practices of power and the labour relations that characterized the agrarian countryside of the two regions – one of which was a former slave society, while the other one was a long-term free labour society. My aim in implementing the methodology of comparative history in this project is to research the specific ways in which the agrarian elites in the U.S. South and southern Italy, despite the temporary loss of power they experienced in the aftermath of the American Civil War and of Italian national unification, managed to maintain a tight grip on the agrarian working classes of the two southern regions – i.e., freed African Americans and free southern Italian peasants – preventing them from moving beyond the social status quo. In this lecture, I compare the Reconstruction U.S. South with post-unification southern Italy by investigating specifically the reasons behind the origin and expansion of violent practices of agrarian vigilantism and criminal activity in the cotton-producing regions of upcountry South Carolina and in the citrus-growing regions of coastal western Sicily. In comparable terms, in both the cases of upcountry South Carolina and coastal western Sicily, those violent practices were tightly related to both a regional agrarian past and the specific historical circumstances of the period between 1865 and 1875. Also in comparable terms, those practices led to the creation of two particular traditions of illegal violent activity – the first Ku Klux Klan and the early Mafia – which, although very different in character, served a similar purpose of controlling the agrarian workforce in areas characterized by the production of highly valuable cash-crops.

Enrico Dal Lago is Professor of American History in the School of Humanities at NUI Galway. Over the past fifteen years, he has published five authored monographs: Agrarian Elites: American Slaveholders and Southern Italian Landowners, 1815-1861 (2005); American Slavery, Atlantic Slavery, and Beyond: The U.S. ‘Peculiar Institution’ in International Perspective (2012); William Lloyd Garrison and Giuseppe Mazzini: Abolition, Democracy, and Radical Reform (2013); The Age of Lincoln and Cavour: Comparative Perspectives on Nineteenth-Century American and Italian Nation-Building (2015); and Civil War and Agrarian Unrest: The Confederate South and Southern Italy (2018). In 2016, he was awarded the DLitt (Doctor of Literature) on Published Work by the National University of Ireland – a higher doctorate awarded to scholars who have published a substantial body of ground-breaking and influential work in a research field and who have achieved outstanding distinction internationally. Professor Dal Lago’s research focuses on the comparative history of the nineteenth-century Americas and Europe, and particularly the United States in the era of the American Civil War and Italy in the age of Italian national unification (the Risorgimento). He utilizes this particular angle to investigate the rise and fall of conservative elite ideologies and exploitative forms of labour, the spread of ideas of reform and progress, and the making and unmaking of nations in the midst of civil conflicts in the course of the nineteenth century.

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